Today’s article on ElderCareMatters.com illustrates the restorative power of guardianship

 

 Physician, Heal Thyself

 

sjacobson
by Shay Jacobson, RN, MA, NMG

Lifecare Innovations, Inc.
Burr Ridge, Illinois
Member of the national Panel for Elder Care Answers

This article, written by Shay Jacobson, President of Lifecare Innovations, shows the restorative power of guardianship, and demonstrates that  the old proverb – Physician, heal thyself – while honorable in its original meaning, may not be quite so honorable in practice.

Imagine a physician, beset by psychiatric problems, who determines her best option is to treat herself.  

Delusional, paranoid, in the throes of an unwanted divorce and thoroughly estranged from her children, Dr. S took out her prescription pad and went to work.  

Dr. S. developed her own treatment plan for the paranoid schizophrenia that had de-railed her life and damaged her relationships. The results were disastrous. Her illness escalated and the tenuous control she once had over her unraveling life vanished entirely. 

This 55-year-old physician was reported to the guardianship court by her divorce attorney. The attorney was trying to represent Dr. S’s best interests as her husband, also a physician, sought to end their lengthy marriage. As a wife, her behavior and ability to comprehend the division of their considerable assets was in question, and her attorney believed she needed a surrogate to help protect her interests in the settlement. 

Bugged and Bellicose 

The case was complicated by Dr. S.’s severe paranoia. She believed her home was bugged and sought refuge in hotels. She relocated to a different hotel nightly, and at no small cost. She was frequently MIA and would resurface when she caused disturbances that required police intervention. Suffice to say, Dr. S was slightly famous among local hotel clerks, and well known to law enforcement. 

Dr. S. was estranged from her two adult children who each fled across the country to establish lives that were not controlled by their mother’s chaotic mental illness. Although they both loved their mother, they believed sharing in her life would destroy theirs. They flatly refused to participate in the guardianship hearing but provided collateral information to verify the extent of her illness and its startling progress. 

The guardianship proceeding started with an extensive psychiatric assessment and included a thorough review of her recent medication history. It was at this time that Dr. S’s proclivity for self-prescribing came to light. Also discovered was her uncontrolled diabetes. The court approved a private guardian of person and a bank to act as guardian of estate; each of these entities would represent her interests in the divorce proceedings. 

The tangle we encountered at the start of this case was difficult to unwind. Dr .S. was a prominent social figure; she sat on many boards and ran for local political positions. She continued to privately write prescriptions for herself and others, including psychotropic medication. The guardian had her medical license revoked and also withdrew her from local political posts. The divorce was finalized and the rebuilding process commenced in earnest. 

The Doctor is Out 

As with most adults who obtain a guardianship through contested court procedure, Dr. S. was a reluctant client, to say the least. Her mental illness interfered with her perception of her situation and distorted her understanding of the need to establish a new approach to life and her problems. Every effort to knit her life back together was met with staunch resistance. 

As her guardians, we kept reminding ourselves that the only way to climb a mountain was by putting one foot in front of the other. We began by helping her manage her diabetes. Fluctuating blood sugars clearly added to her confusion. 

Once the medical situation was stabilized, we developed a plan of treatment to address her mental illness. The illness had been long and ruinous for her. Her children reported that her paranoia had caused the estrangement and spanned at least 15 years. They felt the situation was hopeless and that their mother would never again be a part of their lives. 

All of Dr. S’s self-prescribed medications were discontinued and her physician admitted her for medication stabilization. She was discharged to her home with 24-hour in-home care to maintain supervision. She placed in excess of 200 phone calls a day to our offices, the courts, and her attorneys. And then the miracles started to happen.

The new medications, delivered in a careful regimen, started to calm her paranoia. With her blood sugars and paranoia under control, she started to take a reality-based look at the rubble left by 15 years of unmanaged mental illness. A sweet and highly intelligent woman by nature, she was shocked at what she saw and began to recalibrate her thinking. Step by step, she regained her insight. We were able to decrease her in-home care to come-and-go caretakers. 

Her friends started coming back into her life one at a time. 

Restored At Last 

We kept in constant contact with her children. They were afraid that this transformation would be temporary and that further disappointment was inevitable. Over time, though, they risked re-involvement and initiated weekly phone calls with their mother. There was a lot of catching up to do as their mother was not a part of their lives and did not know about their marriages and the birth of her first grandchild. They finally took the step to have her visit and from there, the healing process accelerated. 

Dr. S. saw renewed purpose in life and worked hard to stay well and strengthen her family ties. We, as guardians, changed our plan to reflect this new reality. We began the restoration process. Dr. S. was fully restored just three years after the initiation of the guardianship. 

The rest of the story continues to unfold. Dr. S.’s husband divorced her over her mental illness. As she recovered, so did their relationship. Dr. S. remarried her husband after her restoration. Today she is working toward restoring her medical license and she continues to have her medical and psychiatric treatment managed by professionals. 

Our once recalcitrant and delusional ward joined us in our office to celebrate her restoration. She looked and felt wonderful. She remains close to the caregiver who spent many hours sorting through her issues with her during the worst times. She sees her children regularly and has become a doting Grandma. 

The story of Dr. S is about many things, but the greatest of these is restoration – specifically, the restorative power of guardianship.

You can find help for this and other elder care matters on America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Professionals – ElderCareMatters.com.

Recent Posts

Stay in Touch with Elder Care Matters

 Facebook  Twitter  Google Plus  Linked  Blogger

eNewsletter Sign Up

ElderCare Answers

If you need answers to your elder care questions, send your questions to us at:

Answers@ElderCareMatters.com

Answers are provided by our ElderCare Matters Partners, some of America's TOP Elder Care Professionals who have years of experience in helping families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care / Senior Care Services.

All Q&A's are posted on the homepage of ElderCareMatters.com

ElderCare Matters Articles

ElderCare Matters Articles are useful and up-to-date Elder Care / Senior Care articles that are provided by our ElderCare Matters Partners to help you plan for and deal with your family's elder care matters.

If you help familes plan for or deal with elder care matters, then you owe it to yourself and to families across America to become a professional member of the National ElderCare Matters Alliance and to be listed on the many Elder Care / Senior Care Directories that are sponsored by this National Alliance of Elder Care Professionals.

ElderCareDirectories.com

For additional information about professional membership in the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, (including the many benefits of becoming one of our ElderCare Matters Partners) and to download an Application for your Basic, Premium or Partner Membership in the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, visit: ElderCare Matters Alliance.