Elder Care / Senior Care Article

This week’s Elder Care article was written by Brian Chew, Esq., Founding Partner of OC Wills & Trust Attorneys in Irvine, California.  Attorney Chew is a Partner member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

TITLE:  6 Events Which May Require a Change in Your Estate Plan

Creating a Will is not a one-time event. You should review your Will periodically, to ensure it is up to date, and make necessary changes if your personal situation, or that of your executor or beneficiaries, has changed. There are a number of life-changing events that require your Will to be revised, including:

  1. Change in Marital Status: If you have gotten married or divorced, it is imperative that you review and modify your Will. With a new marriage, you must determine which assets you want to pass to your new spouse or step-children, and how that may relate to the beneficiary interest of your own children. Following a divorce it is a good practice to revise your Will, to formally remove the ex-spouse as a beneficiary. While you’re at it, you should also change your beneficiary on any life insurance policies, pensions, or retirement accounts. Estate planning is complicated when there are children from multiple marriages, and an attorney can help you ensure everyone is protected, which may include establishing a trust in addition to the revised Will. Depending on jurisdiction, this may also apply to couples who have established or revoked a registered domestic partnership. If one of your Will’s beneficiaries experiences a change in marital status, that may also trigger a need to revise your Will.
  2. Births: Upon the birth of a new child, the parents should amend their Wills immediately, to include the names of the guardians who will care for the child if both parents die. Also, parents or grandparents may wish to modify the distribution of assets provided in their Wills, to include the new addition to the family.
  3. Deaths or Incapacitation: If any of the named executors or beneficiaries of a Will, or the named guardians for your children, pass away or become incapacitated, your Will should be revised accordingly.
  4. Change in Assets: Your Will may need to be changed if the value of your assets has significantly increased or decreased, or if you dispose of an asset. You may want to modify the distribution of other assets in your estate, to account for the changed value or disposition of the asset.
  5. Change in Employment: A change in the amount and/or source of income means your Will should be examined to see if any changes must be made to that document. Retirement or changing jobs could entail moving to another state, thus subjecting your estate to the laws of that state when you die. If the change in income modifies your investing, saving or spending habits, it may be time to review your Will and make sure the distribution to your beneficiaries will be as you intended.
  6. Changes in Probate or Tax Laws: Wills should be drafted to maximize tax benefits, and to ensure the decedent’s wishes are carried out. If the laws regarding taxation of the estate, distribution of assets, or provisions for minor children have changed, you should have your Will reviewed by an estate planning attorney to ensure your family is fully protected and your wishes will be fully carried out.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this Elder Care Matter or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #estateplanningarticles


Elder Care / Senior Care Article

This week’s Elder Care article was written by Lauren Spiglanin, Owner and Founder of Family Connect Care in Rancho Palos Verdes, California.  Ms. Spiglanin is a Partner member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE:  Are we born happy and positive?

Turns out we are NOT born happy and positive, but we can’t help it. It’s not our fault that we have difficulty being happy. Many of us feel happy is a thing you have to schedule.

Sadly, we aren’t wired for it.

Our nature and historic DNA predisposes us to negativity – that pesky fight or flight and survival of the fittest. Our earliest ancestors spent most of their time in avoidance – avoiding hunger, avoiding being eaten, and fighting to survive.

Our predilection to avoid negative outcomes has us prewired for a negative bias. It leads our brain into using up to two thirds of its neurons detecting negativity: should I fight or should I go? That constant focus is further complicated because it’s stored in our long term memory. We hold on to negativity longer, making bad feelings stronger than good.

It’s not all gloom and doom though.

We can turn it around, and we should, because stress takes a toll on us with higher blood pressure, increased aches and pains, cognitive impairments, and a diminished quality of life.

We all seem to have time for stress in our lives. In my work, I see that family caregivers of those living with a loved one who has Alzheimer’s/Dementia appear to have a particularly high level of stress.

So, how do we do it? How do we GET happy?

Since we spend a great deal on negativity, we have to rewire ourselves, retrain our brains. It’s the pursuit of positive experiences and the techniques associated with storing and holding on to them that leads to the Holy Grail of HAPPINESS.

Here are 4 Happy Practices to rewire and retrain your brain

1. Practice Healthy Habits

Not surprisingly, eating a healthy diet and adopting a regular exercise routine allows us to feel better. It doesn’t take more time to eat right. It takes focus on feeling better, which leads us to a more positive outlook.

Okay, exercising might take some extra time. Instead of watching another episode of Real Housewives of Wherever, try just 20 minutes of walking a day. That alone can lower blood pressure and reduce stress levels. The National Institutes of Health suggests that aerobic exercise is associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment and dementia. It may even slow the progression of dementia.

2. Practice remembering the positive moments

Do you know a particularly happy person? They seem alive, walking with a bounce in their step and nothing ever seems to get them down, leading you and others to believe that nothing bad or negative happens to them. That’s simply not true. Bad things happen to everyone but, if we focus on finding positive moments, we don’t have to see the negative or, if we do, we learn to let it go quickly.

To rewire ourselves we must spend as much time with our positive moments as possible. We currently take time to ruminate on the negative so let’s take THAT time to reminisce on the positive.

Journaling helps to savor the moments by spending more time on it. Write about how it felt and what you saw. Think of colorful adjectives to describe the experience. Studies suggest that something as simple as “listing” our gratitude’s – or counting our blessings is effective in holding positive moments.

We ask family care givers to focus on the good days — Take MORE time to consume those good-day-making moments. Was Dad more lucid today, resulting in the two of you having a great conversation? Wrap your arms around that conversation. Write about it, feel it, experience it. It was a good day!

Consider other moments you might experience. Every moment has the ability to envelop all our senses, enabling the ability to build a positivity bias.

3. Practice flipping the script

The adage when life gives you lemons, make lemonade is a great example of a script flip. We get to control how we imprint what happens to us. Now there’s a time-saver.

For family caregivers living with an Alzheimer’s sufferer, new behaviors seem to appear out of nowhere that we find unpleasant and over which we have no control. Such might be the case when Mom arrives to the breakfast table wearing nothing more than a strand of pearls and a smile.

You have some choices: get angry, reason with her, or simply say —

Nice pearls Mom. Let’s make a fashion statement and pair it with that pink robe you have then pour her a cup of coffee.

Questioning the behavior or displaying anger doesn’t help Mom and it certainly doesn’t help you. Letting it go helps you, reframing the situation (or flipping the script) helps you.

4. Practice Mindful Meditation

Meditaion is one of, if not the, most important way of developing focus on positivity. It’s like a clearing of the brain. We are returning our brains to a state of equilibrium which allows us to recharge, replenish, and rest. Through it, we develop greater present moment awareness and emotional regulation–in other words–we are less stressed.

The benefits cannot be overstated. Studies show that we can change the structure of our brains in as little as 8 weeks of meditation. We gain greater clarity, feelings of calm, and even increased cognitive ability as the practice, “changes gray matter concentration in brain regions involved in learning and memory processes and emotional regulation.”

With the ability to reduce stress, lower blood pressure, and increase cognitive ability, family members caring for someone with Dementia/Alzheimer’s will benefit greatly from the practice. What’s more promising is the growing body of evidence supporting the positive aspects of meditation in that it made seniors feel less lonely and isolated — a link to an increased risk of developing the disease.

There are fundamental ways we ask family caregivers to prepare themselves for the journey from addressing legal and financial issues to learning as much about the disease as possible. Self-care is paramount for the journey too. It gives you, the family caregiver, the strength and tools for navigating the road ahead. Taking time to adopt Happy Practices will go a long way in ensuring your own self-care.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this Elder Care Matter or or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE:  Medicaid Planning: The Importance of a Well Drafted Power of Attorney

This is a recent Pennsylvania Superior Court case that highlights how important a power of attorney can be in proper planning. In this case an executor who was also the agent under a power of attorney for the decedent was forced to account for his use of the power of attorney prior to the death of the decedent. The objections to how the power of attorney was used were not appealed so we did not get all of the details on the document itself. However, the opinion does shed some light, at least by inference, on Medicaid planning with a power of attorney.

Briefly, Medicaid planning is a process where someone accelerates their eligibility for Medicaid (Medical Assistance in PA) by restructuring or transferring assets so that they meet the financial qualifications for Medicaid eligibility sooner and preserve more resources for their loved ones. Sometimes this restructuring is done directly by the applicant (usually an older or disabled adult), through their agent under a power of attorney or by their legal guardian. Today courts are more likely to allow guardians to engage in this planning to protect the healthy spouse, less so to protect an inheritance for the children unless one or more is disabled or a minor. There has been some discussion, but few cases, as to whether a guardian has the power to engage in this planning for other purposes given that a guardian should be able to do anything the incapacitated person can do for him or herself.

Frequently this type of planning is performed via a power of attorney as in the Binnig case. While the details were not provided in the case as to the terms of the power of attorney, it was abundantly clear that the power of attorney lacked certain provisions that allowed for the transfer of assets that occurred prior to death (thereby reducing the size of the estate and causing another beneficiary to object). Not only does the power of attorney need to allow the administrative function of the transfers (i.e. the ability to convey real estate or transfer assets in a bank or brokerage account) but it needs to clearly identify the reasons why the transfers may occur (Medicaid or Asset Protection Planning). An agent under a power has a fiduciary obligation to the principal (the person who authorizes the agent to act on the principal’s behalf). Therefore he or she cannot simply transfer assets of the principal to him or herself unless doing so is in the best interest of the principal absent authority in the power of attorney to do so.

One can infer from the Court’s opinion that, had the power of attorney been properly drafted with this type of planning in mind and discussed with the principal at the time of execution, the plan would have been carried out and the objections dismissed. Particularly after Act 95 of 2014 where sweeping changes were made to the requirements of powers of attorney in Pennsylvania, it is important that you review your financial powers of attorney to make sure your agent has the ability to do what you would want them to do if you are unable to act.

This article was written by Robert M. Slutsky, Esq., of the law firm Robert Slutsky Associates in Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania.  Mr. Slutsky is a Partner member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with this Elder Care Matter or or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#MedicaidPlanning, #Medicaid, #findMedicaidAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #MedicaidArticles


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

 

TITLE:  A Cautionary Tale… Protect Your Hard Earned Money

In the land of opportunity, many people have “made it” and made it big. Mr. Roman Blum did just that. However, having amassed close to 40 million dollars, he died last year at the age of 97 with no apparent heirs to his fortune. According to the state comptroller’s office, Mr. Blum’s estate is the largest unclaimed estate in New York State history. His story illustrates how critical it is to engage in estate planning.

 

Mr. Blum was born in Poland. Having survived the Holocaust, he met and married his wife, also a Holocaust survivor, after the war. They migrated to the United States and settled in Forest Hills. He was a real estate developer who seized the opportunity to develop land in Staten Island when the Verrazano Bridge opened in 1964. He ultimately moved to Staten Island himself. He and his wife never had any children. It was said that the former Mrs. Blum suffered from infertility after being a subject of Dr. Mengele’s experiments while she was held in Auschwitz. The couple eventually divorced and Mrs. Blum later died in 1992. Mr. Blum was said to have had a wife and children in Poland before the war, but there is no evidence of any surviving relatives.

 

In a case like that of Mr. Blum, in which no will was found, the estate will be distributed according to the laws of intestacy. This means that the estate will go through an “administration proceeding” where an administrator (the equivalent of an executor in a will) is appointed to handle the estate. The following list of individuals may petition to be the administrator of the decedent’s estate:

(a)  surviving spouse, (b)  children, (c)  grandchildren, (d)  father or mother, (e)  brothers or sisters, (f)  other persons who are distributees (entitled to receive under the law).

 

If none of the above individuals exist, the Public Administrator of the county will be appointed. Currently, the Richmond County Public Administrator’s office is handling the estate of Mr. Blum. The Public Administrator is charged with collecting his assets, selling them, and paying the appropriate federal and New York State estate taxes. The Public Administrator is also conducting a thorough search for a will, and is hiring a genealogist in an effort to find Mr. Blum’s relatives. If any relatives are found, the order of individuals entitled to inherit from Mr. Blum’s estate is as follows:

  1. surviving spouse and descendants (children, grandchildren, etc);
  2. surviving parents;
  3. surviving descendants of parents (i.e. siblings, nephews and nieces);
  4. surviving grandparents or the descendants of grandparents (i.e. uncles, aunts, and cousins)

 

If no will is found and no relatives are located, Mr. Blum’s estate will be turned over to the New York City Department of Finance. After three years, if no relatives come forward, the funds will then go to the New York State Comptroller’s office as unclaimed funds. If any relatives ever surface, all the funds will be returned.

 

Mr. Blum’s case is a stunning example of the importance of engaging in estate planning. Even if you do have close relatives, it is imperative to take control of your own estate. Why have New York State determine who your beneficiaries will be? Be proactive and make sure that you have a well-prepared will, power of attorney, statutory gifts rider, health care proxy, living will, and living trust. If Mr. Blum had planned ahead, he could have specified in a will that his estate would go to charitable organizations serving Holocaust survivors. Or, he could have engaged in more complex estate planning to avoid or minimize estate taxes and provide for an extensive list of beneficiaries.

This article was written by Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq, CELA, managing attorney of Ronald Fatoullah & Associates in Great Neck, New York.  Mr. Fatoullah is a Partner member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with your estate plan or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#EstatePlanning, #findEstatePlanningAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #EstatePlanningArticles


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: Are Smaller Inheritances a New Trend?

Written by:

Inheritances
Scott A. Makuakane, Esq., CFP
Est8Planning Counsel LLLC
Honolulu, Hawaii
An ElderCare Matters Partner & Hawaii State Coordinator

Due to demographic changes and changing economic fortunes, older Americans increasingly have to transfer money to their adult children to help support those children. Barron’s, in a recent article titled “Boomers Spend Their Kids’ Inheritance – On Supporting Them,” reports that intra-family transfers have increased significantly in the last few years.

The article is a good read for anyone interested in retirement and demographic trends.

For estate planning purposes, this trend could create some issues. For starters, if the money is being spent now, then it obviously cannot be part of the estate later and children might receive smaller inheritances than they are expecting.

What if one child receives more support from the parents while they were alive than another child? This could lead to bitterness and even fighting over the estate. This is likely to happen if the estate plan divides what is left between the children equally, even though one or more children received money along the way.

Parents who are helping to support their adult children now should speak with an experienced estate planning attorney about what that means for their estate plan.

No parent wants a family feud as his or her legacy.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with your estate plan or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#EstatePlanning, #findEstatePlanningAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #EstatePlanningArticles


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE:  Special Needs Trusts

Written by:

Special Needs Trusts
Sheri R. Abrams, Esq.
Sheri R. Abrams, Attorney at Law
Oakton, Virginia
An ElderCare Matters Partner 

Why Would Someone Need a Special Needs Trust?

Many well-intentioned parents don’t realize that an inheritance may cause many problems for their disabled or special needs child.

Under current Federal law, any inheritance of more than $2,000 disqualifies individuals with disabilities from most federal needs based assistance, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid. Benefits from state public assistance programs may also be affected.

A Special Needs Trust, however, offers a means of protecting your child’s eligibility for these benefits, while addressing the ongoing care and needs of your disabled or special needs child.

What are the Advantages of a Special Needs Trust?

The primary advantage a Special Needs Trust offers over a direct gift or inheritance is that, if arranged properly, the assets in the trust do not actually belong to the beneficiary. In this way, the trust can provide benefits to an individual but not cause the individual who has a disability to be disqualified from government programs.

A Special Needs Trust holds title to property for the benefit of a child or adult who has a disability.

The Special Needs Trust can be used to provide for the needs of a person with a disability and to supplement benefits received from various governmental assistance programs.

Special Needs Trusts typically provide for:

– medical and dental expenses;

– eye glasses;

– annual independent check-ups;

– transportation (including vehicle purchase);

– equipment;

– training programs;

– maintenance;

– education;

– insurance (including payment of premiums);

– rehabilitation; and

– essential dietary needs.

Special Needs Trusts also may allow a trustee to give the beneficiary money for:

– various forms of entertainment (e.g., movies);

– electronic equipment;

– trips and vacations;

– computer equipment;

– athletic training and competitions;

– companion services/home health aide; and

– other items to enhance self-esteem.

A trust can hold cash, stocks, personal property, and real property. It can own and/or be the beneficiary of life insurance.

Special Needs Trusts also can be used to protect personal injury settlements or judgments from jeopardizing government benefit eligibility.

Most importantly, Special Needs Trusts can help parents coordinate their estate plans and provide peace of mind that their child will be provided for.

An Attorney with knowledge of Special Needs Trusts can assist parents, family members or friends

establish a Special Needs Trust, during their lifetime or by a Will, for a disabled person without risking that person’s eligibility for public benefits

An Experienced Attorney can also establish an Special Needs Trust for the benefit of a disabled person using that person’s own funds – without incurring a penalty period for Medicaid.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#SpecialNeedsPlanning, #SpecialNeeds, #findSpecialNeedsAttorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers, #elderlawattorneys, #findelderlawattorneys, #SpecialNeedsArticles


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: Medical and Pension Veterans Benefits

Written by:
What Medical and Pension Benefits Are Available to Veterans?
Don L. Rosenberg, Attorney andCounselor
Barron, Rosenberg, Mayoras & Mayoras, P.C.
Troy, Michigan
An ElderCare Matters Partner

Veterans, as well as spouses and dependents, may be eligible for a variety of medical and pension benefits. If you or a loved one is a veteran, it is important to be aware of these benefits and know if you are eligible.

Medical Care Veterans Benefits

The VA provides medical care benefits to veterans. The standard medical benefit package includes preventative care services, outpatient and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services (including mental health and substance abuse treatment), prescriptions, and long-term care, which can include nursing home care for eligible veterans.

To be eligible for medical benefits, most veterans must be enrolled in the VA health system. Those veterans who need not be enrolled in the VA health system to qualify for medical care benefits are:

    • 50 percent or more disabled due to a service-connected disability
    • seeking care for a VA rated, service-connected disability
    • discharged for a disability less than a year ago that the military determined was caused or worsened by your service, but the disability is not yet rated by the VA.

 

The VA considers a number of factors to determine whether or not a veteran is eligible. To qualify, the veteran must not have been dishonorably discharged. Length of service is also one factor. In general, you must have served a continuous 24-month period of active duty military service. There are many exceptions to this, including for reservists, national guard members, service-related disabilities, and hardship discharges. Other factors include whether or not the veteran has service-related disability, what the veteran’s income level is, and what VA resources are available.

Disability Veterans Benefits

The VA offers two major disability-related benefit programs: disability compensation and disability pension.

Disability Compensation

Disability compensation benefits are available for veterans suffering from service-connected disabilities. This means that you are 10% or more disabled from an injury or disease was incurred or aggravated while on active duty, active duty training, or inactive duty training. Amount of compensation depends on the degree of disability. Veterans may also receive benefits for diseases or conditions that are secondary to service-connected conditions or for diseases or conditions that may be presumed to be from service even if they occur after service is complete.

The compensation you receive is based on compensation rates set out by the VA. Compensation is between 10% and 100% depending on severity. If you are 30% or more disabled and you have dependents, then you may qualify for an additional allowance.

Disability Pension

The VA pension is available to low-income veterans. It is available to the veteran, veteran’s spouse, and children. For this pension, your injury or disease need not be service-connected.

In order to be eligible, the veteran must meet certain requirements. The veteran must have served 90 days of active duty service, with at least one day of wartime service. If you entered active duty after September 7, 1980, you must have served 24 months or the full period you were called into active duty, with at least one day of wartime service.

In addition, to be eligible, you must meet one of the following — you must be either at least 65 years old, permanently and totally disabled, a patient in a nursing home requiring skilled nursing care, receiving Social Security Disability Insurance, or receiving Supplemental Security Income.

Your annual family income must be less than the limit Congress set. Countable income includes earnings, disability / retirement payments, annuity interest and dividend payments, and net income from farming or business. Net worth includes bank accounts, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, annuities, and property other than residence and reasonable lot area. If you qualify for the disability pension, then you would receive the difference between countable income and the annually set pension limit.

Aid and Attendance

This is a veteran’s pension benefit program available to veterans and their families. The program is available to help with unreimbursed home health and medical costs and the unreimbursed cost of assisted living.
There are four requirement prongs that must be met to qualify for Aid and Attendance. This benefit can be the difference for a Veteran or the widow of a Veteran from having to go to a nursing home or staying at home or in assisted living. The yearly benefit for a Veteran can be as much as $21,000 and a widow of a Veteran almost $14,000. All benefits are income tax free.

Service Prong — The Veteran must have served in the active military, navy or air service: (1) for 90 consecutive days or more during a period of wartime, (2) during a period of war was discharged under conditions other than dishonorable or released from such service for a service-connected disability, (3) for a period of 90 consecutive days or more and such a period began or ended during a period of war; or (4) for an aggregate of 90 days or more in two separate periods of service during more than one period of war.

Disability Prong — The applicant need not have a service-connected condition, but must be “permanently and totally disabled”, meaning the veteran needs “care or assistance” on a “regular basis” from another person which protects him or her from “dangers of a daily living environment”. There are many ways to sufficiently show this including being blind, living in an assisted living facility, needing adjustment or attendance to prosthetics or orthopedic appliances, being unable to dress or clean oneself, or has a serious mental or physical incapacity that requires regular assistance. However, the VA presumes “disability” for individuals over the age of 65. Furthermore, the veteran or a widow of a veteran must need assistance with at least two activities of daily living, such as eating, bathing, dressing, transferring and toileting or being cognitively impaired.

Asset Prong — The VA pension benefit is a needs based benefit, and while there is no hard and fast rule, we recommend the surviving spouse should not have more than $40,000.00 plus a home and a car. Before you or loved ones think about transferring assets or doing any other planning, you should consult with one of our estate planning and elder law attorneys. Improper transfers can affect Medicaid eligibility.

Income Prong — The basic rule is one’s unreimbursed medical expenses have to exceed or equal their income to qualify for the full benefit amount. If not, then the veteran could receive a partial benefit. If one does not have actual medical expenses payable to a third party there can be a way to establish a care contract between family members that will qualify as a medical expense.

Determining what benefits you qualify for can get overwhelming, but remember that it can be relieving as well. If you qualify for VA benefits, you should find out as soon as possible so that you can properly undertake veterans planning.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

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This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: Four Myths About Medicaid’s Long-Term Care Coverage

Written by:
Medicaid
Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq., CELA
Ronald Fatoullah & Associates
Great Neck, New York
An ElderCare Matters Partner

Long-term care is not cheap. The cost of employing a home care attendant in the New York City area ranges from $15 to $25 an hour and a nursing home bed runs from approximately $12,000 to $15,000 per month. Finding the right solution to help pay for long-term care is critical. While Medicare gets most of the news coverage, Medicaid still remains a mystery to many individuals. The fact is that Medicaid is the largest source for funding nursing home care. However, there are many myths about exactly who qualifies for Medicaid and what coverage it provides. Here are four myths about funding long-term care.

Myth #1: Medicare will cover my nursing home expenses.

While Medicare does provide some coverage for nursing home expenses, the coverage is quite limited and is not long-term. Medicare covers only up to 100 days of “skilled nursing care” per spell of illness, of which only 80 days are fully covered. The patient must start paying a copayment of $148 per day (as of 2013) from the 21st to the 100th day unless he or she has supplemental insurance that will cover the copayment. To qualify for Medicare, the patient must enter a Medicare-approved “skilled nursing facility” or nursing home within 30 days of a hospital stay that lasted at least three days, and the care in the nursing home must be for the same condition.

Myth #2: You need to be poor to qualify for Medicaid.

Medicaid helps needy individuals pay for long-term care, but you do not need to be completely destitute to qualify. Generally, as of 2013, an individual is allowed to have up to $14,400 in assets and up to $820 in monthly income to qualify for Medicaid. In addition, retirement accounts of any amount in payout status are exempt in New York State. However, eligibility for Medicaid is not that cut and dried and often depends on the facts of each case. The rules vary depending on whether an individual is looking for “Community Medicaid”, which covers home care costs, or “Institutional Medicaid”, which covers nursing home costs. Eligibility is also different when the applicant has a spouse. Potential applicants or caregivers are strongly encouraged to explore with an elder law attorney the possibility of qualifying for Medicaid in order to help defray the cost of long-term care.

Myth #3: A prenuptial agreement will protect my assets from being counted if my spouse needs Medicaid.

A prenuptial agreement only works to keep property separate in the event of death or divorce. It does not keep property separate for purposes of Medicaid eligibility. However, a “sick spouse” may still be eligible for Medicaid even if the “well spouse” has assets. A “well spouse” should explore the eligibility rules with an elder law attorney.

Myth #4: I can give away up to $14,000 a year under Medicaid rules.

The rule that allows gifting up to $14,000 per year is an Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rule, NOT a Medicaid rule. The IRS allows an individual to gift up to $14,000 a year without incurring any gift tax liability. However, under Medicaid rules, a gift of $14,000 or any other significant amount will trigger a penalty period. This means that for approximately every $11,000 gifted within the 5 year period before a nursing home Medicaid application is filed, Medicaid will not cover the applicant for one month. It is important to note that there is no penalty period on transfers of assets for community-based Medicaid eligibility.

Dispelling the above myths should encourage individuals or their caregivers to explore Medicaid as an option to paying for long-term care. Medicaid is definitely a viable alternative for many of us and is commonly used. However, the rules are complex and it is critical to consult with your elder law attorney to ensure no stone is left unturned.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help in planning for and/or dealing with long-term care or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

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This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: The Formal Probate Administration Process

Written by:
Probate
I. Michael Tucker, Esq.
Law Office of I. Michael Tucker, P.L.C.
Altamonte Springs, Florida
An ElderCare Matters Partner

If someone dies owning assets in his or her name alone (“probatable assets”), there must be
a probate court proceeding to determine who is to receive the assets. In other words, the Will
is given effect through the probate court proceedings. Even if no Will exists a probate
proceeding is necessary.

Probate means “prove.” One must prove to the probate court that the Will is valid, that the
maker was competent and not forced to make the Will, that the heirs and representatives are
proper, that all creditors have been paid and that all persons are getting their just due. Only
after the proofs are made may an heir receive his or her inheritance.

The most common probate proceeding is called the FORMAL PROBATE ADMINISTRATION
proceeding. The following must be done to start and prosecute the proceeding:

STEP ONE: You need to furnish your attorney with the following information and
documents:

1. Original copy of Will or proof that no Will exists;
2. Certified copy of Death Certificate (without cause of death listed);
3. A general description of the kind and value of probatable assets;
4. Names and addresses of all persons named in Will. If any are under the age 18, state so
and give names and addresses of their parents or guardians;
5. Names and addresses of all of the decedent’s following relatives who are named in the
Will (if any are under the age of 18, state so and give names and addresses of their parents or
guardians);
a) Decedent’s parents
b) Decedent’s spouse
c) Decedent’s children
d) Children of deceased children
e) If none of the above exist, then:
i) brothers and sisters of decedent
ii) children of deceased brothers and sisters.
6. Names and addresses of person(s) nominated as personal representatives (executors) in
the Will; and
7. Retainer for fees and costs.

TIME FRAME FOR STEP ONE: 30 days

STEP TWO: Once that information is furnished to the attorney he can commence the
work:

1. Prepares petition for nominated Personal Representative (PR) to sign, listing the same
information as noted above. Obtain signatures.
2. Prepares oath of office and designation of agent for service of process for signature of
nominated PR. Obtain signature.
3. Prepares proposed orders for court to sign.
4. Files original Will, certified copy of death certificate, petition, oath of office and
designation of agent for service of process and proposed orders with Court. Pays court fees.
5. Prepares waivers for heirs and other interested persons to sign.
6. Sends copies of Will, petition and waivers to each heir and interested party by certified
mail, return receipt requested. Recipients have 20 days after receipt of those papers to file
objections to the proceedings, to the Will or to the appointment of the nominated PR. If
addresses are unknown, attorney will have a newspaper publish notices of the proceeding to
notify heirs and interested parties.
Assuming there are no objections filed the Court will grant two (2) orders: one, admitting
the Will for probate and, two, giving Letters of Administration (certificate of appointment) to
PR. If there are objections filed, then hearings will be held.

TIME FRAME FOR STEP TWO: Generally 2 to 3 weeks

STEP THREE: The attorney will pay for and obtain certified copies of the orders and then
commences to do the following work:

1. Causes a notice to be published for two weeks in a newspaper in the county wherein
proceedings are held. Creditors have ninety (90) days after publication to file claims.
2. Asks PR to give the following information:
a) names and addresses of known creditors.
b) detail listing of probatable assets and values thereof.
3. Sends notice to known creditors who then have thirty (30) days to file claims after their
receipt of notice.
4. Prepares an inventory of assets and values for signature.
5. Sends inventory copy to all heirs and interested persons and files same with court.
6. Aids PR in obtaining assets with use of Letters of Administration and to sell real estate
and obtain bank accounts, etc. Note that if attorney handles real estate sale an additional fee
will be due over and above that incurred for probate proceedings.
7. If decedent owned real estate, a tax return must be filed with the State to remove any
estate tax lien thereon. There will be no estate taxes to be paid if the estate is under
$5.43million in value (2015). If estate is over $5.43 million in value, an accountant must be
hired to do federal and state estate tax returns.
8. All cash proceeds and cash assets to be held by PR in bank accounts created in estate
name.
9. PR commences to pay all bills and can make partial distributions to heirs, saving some
funds to cover unknown creditors. Attorney obtains receipts from heirs and files same with
the court.
TIME FRAME FOR STEP THREE: 100 Days (or 9 months if federal estate tax
return necessary).

STEP FOUR: Final Procedures

1. PR furnishes attorney with detailed information as to:
a) Value and nature of estate originally held as per Inventory filed earlier
b) Additions or deletions therefrom
c) Expenses paid
d) Amounts remaining
e) Distributions made
2. Attorney prepares Final Accounting for Court, obtaining PR signature.
3. Attorney prepares petition for discharge for Court. Obtains PR signature.
4. Attorney prepares proposed court order for distribution and discharge.
5. Attorney files Final Accounting, petition and proposed order with court and sends same
to heirs and interested parties. (This is usually waived by family members and they sign a
waiver and acknowledgement of their receipt of their share of the estate) Others have 20 days
after receipt of same to file objections (usually charities, etc.).
6. Attorney obtains certified copy of discharge order from court after objection period
ends.
TIME FRAME FOR STEP FOUR: 40 days

*Note that all time frames are estimates. Much depends on how quick and accurate
information and signatures are forthcoming from the personal representatives, heirs
and other interested persons. Much time will be spent, additional to that noted above, if
objections or creditors’ claims are involved.

Thus, about 185 days (6 months or so) are usually necessary to process a FORMAL
ADMINISTRATION probate proceeding. However, most times, heirs could start receiving
their due after 45-60 days. Due to government funding cuts and staffing cuts over the past
several years, additional delays occur.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help with a probate matter or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the professional help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

#probate, #probateattorneys, #findprobateattorneys, #eldercare, #seniorcare, #eldercarematters, #seniorcarematters, #eldercarearticles, #seniorcarearticles, #elderlawarticles, #elderlawanswers


This Week’s Elder Care / Senior Care Article

TITLE: The Perils and Pitfalls of Doing Asset Protection Planning on Your Own

Written by:
Asset Protection Planning
Robert M. Slutsky, Esq.
Robert Slutsky Associates
Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania
An ElderCare Matters Partner

Dealing with long term care planning, and especially asset protection planning, is a daunting process. Very complicated state and federal Medicaid laws and regulations present many pitfalls for those who try to engage in that process on their own without working with a competent elder law attorney. A recent Medicaid case from New Jersey is an example of a family that tried to go through the process on their own and are now dealing with some pretty nasty consequences. See C.W. v. New Jersey Division of Medical Assistance and Health Services, NO. A-02352-13T2 (NJ Sup. Ct. App. Aug. 31, 2015).

The facts are as follows: “C.W.” was a 90 year old New Jersey resident who moved into a skilled nursing facility in 2007. The following year, she transferred her home and $540,000 in assets to her children, which together were worth approximately $864,000. The following year C.W. applied for Medicaid benefits. Not surprisingly, the state Medicaid authorities imposed a penalty of 10 years and 4 months before they were willing to begin paying her nursing home costs. At that point, her children tried to fix the problem. They returned $235,000 to C.W. who in turn paid that amount to her nursing home. Then, her children returned the home to her, which was then sold. Oddly enough, the sale proceeds were then deposited into an account in the children’s names, not in C.W.’s name, with the children executing a written agreement to transfer the amount of C.W.’s care cost to her each month. C.W. then reapplied for Medicaid and was again denied as before.

Let’s consider each of the many mistakes made by C.W.’s family and also consider how the results may have been different. Under the Medicaid rules, when a Medicaid penalty period is assessed, it takes the form of a time period before which benefits will be paid. The simple mathematical formula takes the total gifted amount and divides it by the average monthly cost of private-paid skilled nursing home in that state. As of July 1, 2015 in Pennsylvania, that divisor amount is now $8916.65. Dividing $864,000 by $8916.65 would result in a penalty period of roughly 97 months.

What were some of C.W’s mistakes?

The first mistake was in not understanding the rules of Medicaid’s 60 month look back period. When you apply for Medicaid, the administrative authorities are allowed to do a complete financial audit of the Medicaid applicant’s financial activities over the previous 60 months. Whatever was done earlier than 60 months before the application is never considered and has no effect whatsoever on Medicaid eligibility.

There are situations where someone is fairly healthy when they engage in asset protection planning but then suffers unanticipated health issues that force a move to a nursing home much sooner than they ever thought they might need it. That is clearly not the case for C.W. as she was already in a nursing home when she started gifting away her assets. In C.W.’s case, applying for Medicaid in 2008, she would have had no problems if she did the exact same gifting of assets in 2003 or earlier. Alternatively, the family could have considered delaying the Medicaid application for a few years and instead, privately paying the nursing home from the gifted funds until the 60 month look back period elapsed.

The second mistake was in transferring C.W.’s home out of her name. When a single individual applies for Medicaid, their home may be considered an exempt asset if they have a reasonable expectation of returning to the home within a relatively short period of time (at least initially, but the rule might require the home to be sold later on depending on circumstances). As soon as C.W. transferred the home, it ceased to be an exempt asset for purposes of her eligibility. Then, after her children conveyed the house back to her, it was sold. Once the equity in the home is converted to cash, it ceases to be exempt. At that point we might also question why the sales proceeds were put into the children’s’ bank account, rather than staying in C.W.’s account, because she therefore ultimately re-gifted that amount back to the kids.

Also, it is important to note that for income tax purposes, once C.W. transferred the house to her children, the opportunity to claim an exemption from capital gains tax on the sale of the home could have been lost. If the house had been sold by the children instead of being transferred back to C.W. first, and assuming that the house sold for $324,000, and further assuming for our purposes that C.W. had paid approximately $150,000 for the house, then capital gain of $174,000 would have to recognized by the children upon the sale of the home. At a probable 15% capital gains tax rate, there would be $26,100 in capital gains tax due to the IRS because of the sale.

Clearly, good advice from a qualified elder law attorney could have made a big difference in the costs ultimately borne by C.W. and her family for her long-term care needs.

21 “Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories

If you need help with this elder care matter or with any Elder Care / Senior Care issue, you can find the help you need in one of the following 21Mobile Friendly” Elder Care / Senior Care Directories. These Elder Care / Senior Care – specific Directories are sponsored by the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, an organization of thousands of America’s TOP Elder Care / Senior Care Professsionals who help families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care Matters.

  1. ElderCareMatters.com
  2. ElderCareMattersBlog.com
  3. ElderCareWebsites.com
  4. ElderCareAnswers.us
  5. ElderCareArticles.us
  6. ElderCareProfessionals.us
  7. ElderLawAttorneys.us
  8. EstatePlanningAttorneys.us
  9. FindDailyMoneyManagers.net
  10. FindElderCareMediators.net
  11. FindElderLawAttorneys.net
  12. FindEstatePlanningAttorneys.net
  13. FindGeriatricCareManagers.net
  14. FindHomeCareProviders.net
  15. FindLongTermCareInsurance.net
  16. FindMedicaidAttorneys.net
  17. FindProbateAttorneys.net
  18. FindSeniorLivingCommunities.net
  19. FindSeniorMoveManagers.net
  20. FindSpecialNeedsAttorneys.net
  21. FindVAAccreditedAttorneys.net

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