Our "Elder Care Experts" are on page 1 of Google

Question:  When you need a quick answer or advice about an elder care matter, who can you ask?

Answer:  The “Elder Care Experts” of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, who can now be found on page 1 of Google.

ElderCareMatters.com is offering a NEW Ask an Elder Care Expert service.

Each week one of our 1,250+ experts will answer your family’s important questions about elder care matters – from legal, financial, housing, healthcare, etc.

If you would like to ask one of our Elder Care Experts a question about his/her areas of expertise, just send a short email (a few sentences only please) to:  questions@ElderCareMatters.com

Every day we will post one of your questions along with an answer provided by our Featured Elder Care Expert of the Week to the homepage of ElderCareMatters.com (which is currently visited by thousands of families each week).  Yours may be one of the questions posted.

So bookmark ElderCareMatters.com and visit us daily as questions about a wide range of elder care matters are answered by some of America’s top elder care professionals with years of experience helping families plan for and deal with their issues of aging.

___________________________________________________________

If you are an elder care professional and you would like to “get the word out” to thousands of families across America (in a cost effective way) about how you can help them plan for and deal with their issues of aging, then you should join our 1,250+ elder care experts as a lifetime member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

And, now, if you are one of the next 250 new members, you will receive a 25% discount off the regular lifetime membership price.

This 25% discount is only available to the next 250 elder care professionals who join the national ElderCare Matters Alliance as a Lifetime Member.

So if you are a competent, caring elder care professional – take advantage of this special 25% discount offer and pay only $337.50 for a “lifetime membership” (and there are no annual membership dues, ever!).

To request an Application for Lifetime Membership, send an email directly to: psanders@eldercarematters.com

Phillip G. Sanders, MBA, MSHA, CPA
Founder & CEO of ElderCare Matters
1-877-379-4500
www.ElderCareMatters.com


Question of the Day: "My husband feels that his caregivers are trying to "take over". He wants them to stop coming. How do I, his wife, deal with this – what do I say to him?"

Answer:  The situation you describe is not at all unusual.  A complete answer would require a little more information about your husband – and his caregivers.  Whether your husband has any level of dementia, for example, could make a very real difference in his ability to accept care.  If dementia is present, make sure the caregivers are skilled in working with folks with that condition.  If they are not, tell the agency supplying them to replace them.

Even without other factors being present, however, it is important for us to remember that home care is intrusive.  Your husband has been an independent adult for a long time, I assume.  Having to give up some of that independence is a real challenge for any of us. 

What I would recommend is having the discussion with your husband focus on the issues concerning the specific Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) that spurred the decision to initiate home care.  Making sure you and your husband – and his caregivers – understand the specifics of the plan of care is very important.  These “X” services will be performed; everything else will be left to your husband.

Also, in your question, you refer to multiple caregivers.  Ideally, you want to have one consistent caregiver providing services.  If care is provided seven days per week, it may require two people, but there should not be more than two in the team.  The caregiver(s) should be consistent, rather than just whoever shows up.  If the latter is happening, talk to the agency providing service.  Your husband – and you – deserve consistency.  It will result in a higher level of service and make it a lot easier to set the parameters of what is “in” and what is “out” of the plan of care.

Bert Cave
President of Support For Home
Sacramento, California
916-482-8484
Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, California chapter 


Question of the Day: "How will I know when my wife is ready to start receiving in-home care?"

Answer:  The best way to tell if one is ready for in-home care is to have developed a “baseline” of abilities to perform the normal Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) that we must perform in order to live well and safely at home. 

These activities are actually broken down into two groups.  Activities of Daily Living which include personal hygiene and grooming; dressing and undressing; feeding oneself; functional transfers such as moving from bed to a chair; control of urinary and fecal discharge; toileting; and walking or other forms of ambulation.  These basic ADLs are complemented by a set of “Instrumental” ADLs, including ability to do housework; prepare meals; take medications; manage finances; shop for necessities; communicate on the telephone; use technology.

Ideally, we should assess our ability to perform these activities early in our adult lives, when we are well able to perform them.  This removes emotion from the exercise and allows us to do a more objective job of planning for the future.   Or, I may have no problem with mobility at this time but determine that having to depend on others to safely move from bed to a chair means I will need home care

The Advance Living Directive’s focus on our ability to perform normal activities helps us create an objective base for making future – or current – decisions about home care.  If I do not plan ahead, I am likely to be more emotional and much more stressed when the time actually comes.  Working through that planning process with my spouse and children will also get all of us on the same page, before there is any opportunity for distress or discord.

We all understand the need to develop Advance Health Care Directives, Trusts, Wills and the like.  This is simply another instance of planning for the future.  The good thing is that the focus on ADLs and IADLs is not tied to chronic medical conditions, requiring health care.  I may have Diabetes or COPD, for example, and still be perfectly capable of performing the normal activities of living at home. There is obviously a correlation, but the need for home care (non-medical) needs to be assessed separately.

Bert Cave, President
Support For Home
Sacramento, California  95825
916-482-8484
Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, California chapter

 


Question of the Day: "What is the difference between home health care and home care?"

Answer:  The short answer is “medical services”.  Home health care is normally the result of hospitalization or time spent in rehabilitation in a skilled nursing facility.  It is short-term care provided to help a patient transition back home.  Normally, home health care will last four to eight weeks, and the typical services that will be included, as a result of a doctor’s order, are provided by one or more of the following:

  1. Registered Nurse.  This may include wound care, for example, for someone suffering from a pressure ulcer (bed sore).
  2. Physical Therapist.  A patient recovering from a fall or surgery may need guided physical exercise to regain some lost mobility.
  3. Speech Therapist.  For example, a stroke victim may lose some ability to communicate verbally (aphasia).
  4. Occupational Therapist.  The focus may or may not be on the ability to perform a job.  Skills in this area are defined broadly (see below).
  5. Home Health Aide.  This person is normally focused on assistance with bathing services, which may also be provided in non-medical home care.

 Home care is typically non-medical in nature.  It is focused on what are called Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental ADLs: (more…)


Question of the Day: "Is private duty home care covered by Medicare or other forms of medical insurance?"

Answer:  In most cases, private duty home care translates to private pay home care, with families looking to their own resources to pay the cost.  Fortunately, an increasing number of families have obtained long-term care insurance policies, which provide a great deal of support toward the cost of in-home care, as well as, if needed at some point in the future, assisted living facilities. 

A second important source of financial support for in-home care for some families is Veterans Affairs Aid and Attendance Benefits.  The Aid and Attendance program reimburses clients who qualify a significant portion of homecare costs.  The process for applying is a bit complicated and lengthy, but it can be well worth it.

There are obviously other sources of income for seniors who want to “age in place” in their homes, including reverse mortgages, and so forth, but long-term care insurance and Aid and Attendance are the two every senior and every family should look at, whether it is for a senior today or planning for home care in the future.

Bert Cave
President of Support For Home
Sacramento, California  95825
916-482-8484
Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, California chapter


Question of the Day: "How can I become one of the Elder Care Experts on www.ElderCareMatters.com and help families across America plan for and deal with their issues of aging?"

Answer:  If you are an elder care professional and you would like to “get the word out to thousands of families across America in a cost effective way about how you can help them plan for and deal with their issues of aging”, then you should join our 1,250 elder care experts as a lifetime member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.  And, now, if you are one of the next 250 members, you will receive a 25% discount off the regular lifetime membership price.

This 25% discount is available only to the next 250 elder care professionals who join the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

So if you are a competent, caring elder care professional – take advantage of this special 25% discount offer and pay only $337.50 for a “lifetime membership” (and there are no annual membership dues, ever!) to the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

To request an Application for Lifetime Membership, send an email directly to: psanders@eldercarematters.com

Phillip G. Sanders, MBA, MSHA, CPA
Founder & CEO
ElderCare Matters, LLC
1-877-379-4500
www.ElderCareMatters.com


Special Offer: Next 250 Professional Members Receive 25% Discount

If you are an elder care professional and you would like to “get the word out to thousands of families across America in a cost effective way about how you can help them plan for and deal with their issues of aging”, then you should join our 1,250 elder care experts as a lifetime member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.  And, now, if you are one of the next 250 members, you will receive a 25% discount off the regular lifetime membership price.

This 25% discount is available only to the next 250 elder care professionals who join the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

So if you are a competent, caring elder care professional – take advantage of this special 25% discount offer and pay only $337.50 for a “lifetime membership” (and there are no annual membership dues, ever!) to the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

To request an Application for Lifetime Membership, send an email directly to: psanders@eldercarematters.com

Phillip G. Sanders, MBA, MSHA, CPA
Founder & CEO
ElderCare Matters, LLC
1-877-379-4500
www.ElderCareMatters.com


Are there any senior living “environments” that are designed to enable residents to age-in-place?

Answer:  Yes.  But it depends upon where you live.  In Massachusetts there are what we call Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC’s).  A senior will enter in an independent situation (eg. their own apartment); then if needed move to an assisted living facility on the premises (or in some cases get assistance in living within their own apartment), and then, if needed there is a nursing facility component.  Otherwise, each state will have certain home care programs available to allow people to remain in their home and get care.  Some of these opportunities are simple private pay care management companies.  Others are part of state programs.  Each state is different.  If you are interested in home care in your state, you need to contact the equivalent of your Office of Elder Affairs, or an Elder Law Attorney, or Geriatric Care manager to find out what would be available to you.

Another source to find an elder care expert near you is this ElderCare Matters website:  www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm.

Susana Lannik, Attorney at Law
Newton, Massachusetts  02458
617-658-2980
Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Massachusetts chapter

 


"My co-worker's father is a veteran and receives about $700/mo pension from the service as well as a social security check. He is elderly but still able to live on his own. His wife's health has deteriorated rapidly in the last (6) months and she now requires a great deal of care, is not responsible for bodily functions and has dementia. Do you think there would be any VA benefits available to help with his situation? He was told that because he receives a SS and pension check that he won't qualify for any benefits or help."

Answer:  I have had this situation in my office before.  Because your co-worker’s father already receives the $700 per month, it would not pay for him to seek what are known as “aid and attention” benefits to bring in someone to care for his wife.  The $700 would be reduced by the amount of benefits that the VA MIGHT give.  Aid and attention benefits are actually called “improved pension benefits.”  It does sound like your friend’s wife has long term care needs that would be better served in a skilled nursing facility. Some states have some home care programs that are available, but this could be a “patchwork quilt” that would not offer her appropriate continuity of care.  I realize a lot of people hate to do this, but depending upon his situation–eg. the amount of assets he has, whether or not he has made transfers etc.  his wife could be eligible for Medicaid either at home (Medicaid Waiver, Personal Care Assistant) or in a skilled facility.  I would seriously urge your friend to seek out the services of an Elder Law Attorney in your area.

You can find Elder Law Attorneys who are located near you by searching the following Elder Care Matters site:  www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Susana Lannik, Attorney at Law
Newton, Massachusetts  02458
617-658-2980
Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Massachusetts chapter


Question: When you need a quick answer about an elder care matter, who can you ask?

Answer:  The experts of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.

ElderCareMatters.com is now offering a NEW Ask an Elder Care Expert service.

Each week one of our 1,200 experts will answer your family’s important questions about elder care matters – from legal, financial, housing, health care, etc.

If you would like to ask one of our Elder Care Experts a question about his/her areas of expertise, just send a short email (a few sentences only please) to:  Questions@ElderCareMatters.com

Every day we will post one of your questions along with an answer provided by our Featured Elder Care Expert of the Week to the homepage of www.ElderCareMatters.com (which is currently visited by thousands of families each week).  Yours may be one of the questions posted.

So bookmark www.ElderCareMatters.com and visit us daily as questions about a wide range of elder care matters are answered by some of America’s top elder care professionals with years of experience helping families plan for and deal with their issues of aging.

Phillip G. Sanders, MBA, MSHA, CPA
Founder & CEO
ElderCare Matters
1-877-379-4500
www.ElderCareMatters.com


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