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ElderCareMatters.com, along with the 1,375+ Lifetime Members of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, provides families with the resources they need to plan for and deal with their elder care matters.  And now our “Elder Care Experts” are ranked #1 on Google, Yahoo & Bing. This is America’s online source to find elder care experts plus useful information & answers about a wide range of elder care matters. 

Here you will find professionals with years of experience in helping families with the issues of aging, including:

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Together, we provide families with:

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If you and your family need help with elder care matters, this is where you will find 1,375+ competent, caring elder care experts located near you.  Whether you are looking for:

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you can count on www.ElderCareMatters.com to help you find the Elder Care Experts that you will need in ALL 50 states (plus the District of Columbia).  

 
So why wait?  If you are an elder care professional and you would like to “get the word out” to hundreds of thousands of families across America (in a cost effective way) about how you can help them plan for and deal with their issues of aging, then you should join our 1,375+ elder care experts as a lifetime member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance.  

And, now, if you are one of the next 125 new members, you will receive a 25% discount off the regular lifetime membership price

This 25% discount is available only to the next 125 elder care professionals who join the national ElderCare Matters Alliance. 

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Question of the Day: “My father is 88 and lives in an assisted living community, private pay. My mother resides in a town home, which is a debt free property, that she jointly owns with my father. How can my mother plan to protect this asset in the event my father requires nursing care? Given their assets, they cannot afford to pay privately for a nursing home, so they will need my father to become Medicaid eligible for this service."

Answer: Your mother will be able to continue living there as long as she wants and does not have worry that she’ll have to sell it to pay the cost of your father’s nursing home care.

It is very important that your parents meet with an elder law attorney in your state as soon as possible as there are other planning options for your parents to consider that could protect the value of the town home and other assets.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Dagmar M. Pollex, Attorney at Law
The Law Offices of Dagmar M. Pollex, P.C.
Braintree, Massachusetts  02184
781-535-6490

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Massachusetts chapter


Question of the Day: “My father is in a nursing home and is having some hallucinations. Although I have told the nursing staff about this problem, he still hasn’t been seen by a doctor about this yet. I’m concerned that he is not getting the medical care he needs."

Answer:   The first thing I would suggest you do is speak to the chief of nursing or the nursing home administrator about your concerns. If that doesn’t resolve the problem, you can ask for a formal meeting between family members and the appropriate nursing home personnel.

Most states also have a nursing home ombudsman assigned to each nursing home for the purpose of looking into complaints about the care that nursing home residents are receiving. You can contact your state’s Office of Elder Affairs to get contact information for the ombudsman.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Dagmar M. Pollex, Attorney at Law
The Law Offices of Dagmar M. Pollex, P.C.
Braintree, Massachusetts  02184
781-535-6490

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Massachusetts chapter


Question of the Day: "What are the financial transparency and disclosure requirements when one sibling is appointed power of attorney over an elder parent? We are concerned about transfers of money being made with no disclosure or explanation to the siblings, where the transfers are not clearly for my mother’s benefit and where the transfers are made into my sister’s personal bank account."

Answer:  Thanks for the question. I practice law in Florida and my answer reflects how I would respond to a Florida resident.

The power of attorney can only use the money for the benefit of the person who granted the power.

The power of attorney does not have to report to siblings, but if wrong is suspected  may  have to answer to legal authorities and/or elder abuse authorities.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates

Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "Will inheritor of Florida property with low property tax (homesteading) pay a new, higher tax?"

Answer:  Thanks for the question.

The answer is yes-new owner will pay new tax rate  based on current market value at time of transfer.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates

Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "2 elderly sisters are beneficiaries of their deceased sister's Revocable Living Trust. As a result, they have "life estate-type" rights. The trust also maintains the house. The trust is running short of cash, and the trustees are considering getting a reverse mortgage on the house (presently free and clear, valued at about $225,000). If the house had to be titled in the name of the 2 women, solely for the purpose of executing the reverse mortgage, would the sisters' eligibility for Medicaid and SSI be affected?"

Answer:  A homestead would not disqualify the sisters from Medicaid and SSI benefits.  However, a trustee cannot transfer ownership  if sisters are only entitled to “life estate” benefits.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates

Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "I have a revocable living trust. Can my son, as trustee, settle my estate without an attorney?"

Answer:  Having prepared over 36,000 estate plans with over 90% involving trusts – I would recommend your son consult with an attorney for directions on how to proceed based on the assets in the trust and estate. In Florida a trust notice would need to be filed and attorneys should be hired to transfer real estate.

However, the answer to your question is “YES” but not advisable without some advice.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates

Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "I have Power of Attorney for my elderly mother's affairs, but as she becomes increasingly mentally unreliable, what are the pros and cons of becoming her guardian? She lives in WV; I live in another state."

Answer:  Thanks for your question. Guardianships are very expensive, time consuming, and supervised by the courts.

The advantage of having a valid power of attorney is that you have the power to act quickly without court involvement.

The court system in Florida (where I practice) will not usually allow a guardianship when estate documents have been prepared to avoid being declared incompetent.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates

Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "Do testamentary trusts avoid probate?"

Answer:  No!  All wills are probated and testamentary trusts are created within wills; thus assets devised in a will to a testamentary trust would have to be probated.  The fact that a testamentary trust has been created has not accomplished any avoidance of probate.

Testamentary trusts serve a useful purpose in that they can be used as a tax-saving tool to divide large estates, and they can be a useful tool to keep persons from receiving an estate in one lump sum.  Testamentary trusts are also useful when beneficiaries are to receive “income only” monies.

If one has an interest in setting up a trust that has all of the advantages of a testamentary trust plus avoid probate, then an exploration of the “living trust” should take place.  Living trusts are also known as revocable trusts, family trusts, and a grantor’s trust.

Living trusts differ from testamentary trusts in that living trusts are established now while you are living, and you go through a personal (probate) proving process of your estate yourself without using the court process.  This process is accomplished by keeping a Schedule “A” or inventory list of the items you have registered to the trust.  You never lose any power or control over any assets that you own in the trust and you, yourself, serve as “trustee” of the trust.

 A common myth about living trusts is that you lose control of your own property or that the trust needs a tax number.  Neither is true, as no tax number is required and you don’t lose any control of the assets.

The decision concerning whether one would want a living trust versus a testamentary trust will probably center around whether one would want his estate to be probated through the court system or whether one would rather bypass the probate system.

This discussion often centers around who the beneficiaries and successor trustees are.  For example, if the successor trustees and beneficiaries are children, then many people desire to avoid probate and leave their entire estate probate-free.

For those persons who had testamentary trusts drawn into their wills before December of 2009, a thorough review of their documents should be analyzed by an attorney, as the many tax changes that have taken place may have necessitated revisions to their documents.

For a thorough discussion of your estate planning needs, you should ask your attorney about trusts for your estate.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Joseph F. Pippen, Jr., Attorney at Law
Law Office of Joseph F. Pippen, Jr. & Associates
Largo, Florida  33771
727-586-3306

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


Question of the Day: "We’ve had recurring problems handling my mother’s prescription medications. She takes about 10 prescriptions every day, and often she takes the medications in error, i.e., too many, not enough, etc. Last week we had to rush her to the ER because of an unintentional overdose of these prescription medications. What would you recommend we do to resolve this potentially dangerous problem?"

Answer:  There are a number of different solutions, depending on her medication routine, what is causing the difficulties, etc.  When we do a geriatric care assessment, this is often one of the areas explored and it is not unusual to find problems, which as you well know can be very adverse.  We tailor recommendations to the solutions that fit for the individual.

A couple of resources I can share that might work.  First, you’re probably aware of simple pill boxes, where medications are laid out as to when to be taken.  A family member or a R.N. from a home care company can do this.  If your Mom can handle taking the medications from the pillboxes correctly, this can work.  Some clients need additional reminders, and maybe it is feasible for someone in the family to call and help with this.  Some pharmacies and services also package pills in easy-to-use dosages (one of our local pharmacies delivers them right to the client, packed in easy to tear off packets with all the pills for a specified time).

For other clients, especially with cognitive deficits, a more extensive solution may be needed.  There are some wonderful technologies, such as electronic pill dispensers that are pre-loaded and dispense the meds. at the scheduled time.  They typically sound a reminder and have different settings to help avoid missed dosages turning in to overdoses.  Additionally, some of the emergency response systems (fall buttons) have options for medication reminders.  Some clients may need more hands-on, personal assistance.  A home care aide trained in medication assistance can be there to serve as a personal reminder.  You may want to talk to a home care agency about your Mom’s specific needs and see if a reasonable plan can be worked out…with 10 prescriptions, timing may be tough so it may require some creativity or a combination of options.

I always like to go back to the basics too.  I would suggest bringing this up with your Mom’s doctor (or doctors?) and asking if there are any ways to streamline the medication routine.  When pills are prescribed over time (and sometimes by different specialists), the doctor doesn’t have a really good picture of how complex this can be, and obviously at this point there have been adverse effects which make this a priority.  Can any of the pills be eliminated?  Can some of them be taken at the same time, or a larger dosage be taken less frequently?  If a review hasn’t been done recently, it is probably a good idea anyway with such a large # of medications.  There are consultant pharmacists who specialize in medication reviews.

To locate experts in your state who can help you with this elder care matter, go to: www.ElderCareMatters.com/statechapters.htm

Shannon Martin, M.S.W., CMC
Aging Wisely, LLC
Clearwater, Florida  33756
727-447-5845

Member of the national ElderCare Matters Alliance, Florida chapter


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