Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about Life Estates

Question:  What is a “Life Estate”?

Answer:   Think about ownership of real property to consist of a bundle of rights, called “Ownership in Fee Simple,” for example:  the right to use and enjoyment of the property during the owner’s lifetime; the right to use and enjoyment of mineral rights, oil & gas rights, water rights or similar interests; the right to divide one’s ownership rights with other or additional owners; and the right to determine title to the property after the death of the owner.  A person with Ownership in Fee Simple owns all rights and title to the property.  However, any of these individual ownership rights that make up the entire Ownership in Fee Simple can be transferred by deed to someone else without transferring the entire Ownership in Fee Simple.  When this happens the ownership of the property is severed and the result is more than one person having some ownership rights in the property at the same time.

The right to use and enjoyment of the property during an owner’s lifetime is known as a “Life Estate.”  It is created by the execution of a deed that either transfers a Life Estate to someone other than the person with Ownership in Fee Simple; or which transfers all other rights to the property to someone other than the person with Ownership in Fee Simple but retains a Life Estate in the fee simple owner.  A Life Estate can exist based upon the owner’s lifetime or upon the lifetime of another person, although the Life Estate owner’s lifetime is usually the measuring life.  The Life Estate continues only as long as the measuring lifetime.  When the person whose lifetime the Life Estate is based upon dies, the Life Estate ends, that is, it simply ceases to exist.  This means that a Life Estate does not go through probate to determine who will own the property after the Life Estate owner has died.

Rather, because either transferring a Life Estate or transferring all other rights and retaining a Life Estate essentially severs ownership in the property, the deed creating the life estate must be clear as to who owns the remaining interest in the property, known as the “Remainder Interest.”  The owner of the Remainder Interest owns all rights to the property other than the Life Estate while the Life Estate is in existence; and owns all rights to the property altogether once the Life Estate terminates.  In other words, when the Life Estate terminates, the only rights to the property remaining to be owned are already owned by the owner of the Remainder Interest, so that this person will then have Ownership in Fee Simple.

Also, if the Life Estate owner has died, the property can be sold by the owner of the Remainder Interest without the need for anyone else’s consent; and the owner of the Remainder Interest is entitled to all of the proceeds of the sale.  However, due to the fact that ownership has been severed, the property cannot be sold during the lifetime of the Life Estate owner without the consent of the owners of both the Life Estate and the Remainder Interest.  Further, upon sale, the proceeds must be divided between the Life Estate owner and the Remainder Interest owner according to the respective values of their interests as of the date of sale.  This value is determined actuarially based upon the age of the Life Estate owner at the time of sale; and is contained in Life Estate/Remainder Tables issued by the IRS.  The value of the Life Estate is expressed in terms of a decimal fraction that decreases as the Life Estate owner’s age increases.  Since the total of all ownership interests must always equal 100%, the value of the Remainder Interest will increase as the value of the Life Estate decreases.

Because of the nature of the Life Estate, it is a very effective means for passing title to real estate upon death without having to go through the Probate process.  It can also be an effective tool in Medicaid planning to protect the family home from Medicaid Estate recovery in those states whose Medicaid estate recovery is limited to Probate assets.  However, in some states, Medicaid estate recovery rules allow the state Medicaid agency to seek Medicaid estate recovery against a Life Estate after the death of the Life Estate owner.  Anyone considering a Life Estate transfer involving someone who has applied or is planning to apply for Medicaid benefits should consult a local Elder Law attorney experienced in Medicaid first to determine whether transferring a Life Estate or a Remainder Interest is even an effective strategy in that person’s state.

If you need assistance with this or other elder care matters, you can find Elder Care Professionals near you on ElderCareMatters.comAmerica’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

An ElderCare Matters Partner
John J. Campbell, Esq.
Denver, Colorado
An ElderCare Matters Partner

 


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about the Medicaid LookBack Period

Question:  What is the Medicaid “Look Back Period”?

Answer:  The Medicaid Look Back Period is the 5-year period prior to filing a Medicaid application during which all transfers without fair consideration are totaled to assess a period of ineligibility for Medicaid Long Term Care benefits.  It is a common misconception that if any gift transfer is made, the person making the transfer must wait 5 years before applying for Medicaid.  While this is true in the case of some larger gift transfers, it is by no means true in the case of every gift transfer.

The reason for this lies in the differences between the Medicaid Look Back Period and the Period of Ineligibility imposed upon gift transfers made within the Look Back Period.  The Medicaid Look Back Period is limited to 5 years.  On the other hand, there is no limit to the length of the Period of Ineligibility resulting from gift transfers made within the Look Back Period.  The Period of Ineligibility is calculated by totaling the value of all gift transfers made within the Look Back Period and dividing that number by the average monthly cost of nursing home care for an individual in the state where the Medicaid application is filed.  The larger the gift, the longer the Period of Ineligibility will be.   However, the Period of Ineligibility from a gift transfer does not even begin to run until the Medicaid applicant actually files a Medicaid application and the individual is found to be eligible for Medicaid but for the gift transfer.  The Period of Ineligibility then begins to run retroactive to the date of the application (assuming the individual met the functional, income and resource requirements at that time), rather than beginning to run retroactive to the date of the gift transfer itself.

This last point is crucial.  For example, if we assume the average monthly cost of nursing home care in your state is $8,000 per month, then a one month Period of Ineligibility will be imposed for every $8,000 transferred as a gift during the Look Back period.  An $80,000 gift transfer during the Look Back period will result in a 10-month Period of Ineligibility.  If the individual making the gift would meet the criteria for Medicaid eligibility immediately after making the gift and the individual files a Medicaid application right away, the individual’s 10-month Period of Ineligibility would begin on the date of the Medicaid application.  After 10 months, the individual can file a new application and immediately qualify for Medicaid, assuming the individual continues to meet the eligibility criteria.

If the same individual makes a gift of $480,000, the Period of Ineligibility would be 60 months, or 5 years.  In that case, the individual should wait 5 years after the gift before applying for Medicaid.   However, if that individual miscalculates the dates and files a Medicaid application after 4 years and 11 months, the individual will not only have gone without Medicaid benefits for 4 years and 11 months, but will also be assessed an additional 5 years of ineligibility due to the gift itself!

Making gifts to qualify for Medicaid is a planning strategy that should never be attempted without the assistance of an experience Elder Law attorney.  The rules are simply too complex and the penalties too severe for a “do-it-yourself” project.  Only someone having extensive experience with and knowledge of all applicable Medicaid rules and planning strategies can ensure that a “gifting” strategy will not horribly backfire and end up doing more harm than good.

If you need assistance with this or other elder care matters, you can find Elder Care Professionals near you on ElderCareMatters.comAmerica’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

An ElderCare Matters Partner
John J. Campbell, Esq.
Denver, Colorado
An ElderCare Matters Partner

 


Answer to today’s Elder Care Question on ElderCareMatters.com – Consult an Elder Law Attorney

Question:  My mother is 78 years old and has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. She and my father (who is 79 years old) have a paid off home, and both receive small pensions and Social Security. My question is how I, the daughter and an only child, should start getting information about the elder care benefits to which my parents may be entitled. For example, I’m not very knowledgeable about Medicaid, Medicare, VA Benefits, etc. With whom should I talk to get this type of elder care information BEFORE I actually need it? 

By the way, I appreciate all that www.ElderCareMatters.com does to help families across America with their Elder Care Matters.

Answer:  You need to consult with an experienced and skilled elder law attorney.   An elder law attorney can help you navigate the most complicated and overwhelming area of the law.  Elder Law is a specialty developed to serve the needs of seniors and those that will become seniors one day.  In other words it is for anyone who wants to be old one day.  Elder Law is much more that Estate Planning.  An attorney specializing in Elder Law will help with the tough questions like:

Who will make my medical decisions when  I am no longer able to make them?

If I am unable to care for myself, how can I  achieve the greatest quality of care without bankrupting me or my family?

Who will make my end of life decisions?

What happens if I get sick and can’t stay in my home anymore?

How am I going to pay for my long term care?

Not many people look forward to giving up their independence and moving into a long term care facility, even if it is in their best interest. Fortunately, as our population has aged, care alternatives to the traditional nursing home have emerged, such as home care, assisted living, adult day care and senior apartments.  These options can cost anywhere from $30,000 to $100,000 a year or more.  Unfortunately, to pay for these services, many seniors will quickly go through their entire life savings and assets, when it is not necessary.  There is a better way, that is to plan now!  For example many people believe in the old notion that to protect their assets, they need to give away assets to family at least five years before entering a nursing home.  First this is usually not true and further, while this may be a good idea for some, it is not for everybody.   First, there is no guarantee that the nursing home is the best option.  In fact, no one ever wants to go into a nursing home.  There may be other strategies available that will allow one to remain in their home, assist with the cost of home care or the expense of assisted living.  Some of these options are exploring Veterans benefits for qualified Veterans and their spouses and using home based community care options.  Second, if gifting is done improperly, it may cause you to lose Medicaid benefits you might otherwise be entitled to.  Gifting your assets without the assistance of an experienced Elder Law attorney usually limits your choice and quality of care substantially.

Finally, there will be greater opportunities for better care at the least cost to those that become informed and seek the assistance of a experienced Elder Law attorney.   For example,  Who Can You Trust To Make Your Decisions When You Cannot Make Them Yourself?  It is a common misunderstanding that your spouse or children can act for you during a disability.  The truth is, if you cannot make your own medical and financial decisions, a court of law will.  It is essential that everyone over 18 years of age creates a Durable Power of Attorney.  A Durable Power of Attorney is a legal document allowing you to delegate your personal, health care and financial responsibilities to an agent.  You decide who that agent is and how much power to give the agent.  If you become incapacitated without a Durable Power of Attorney, no one can legally act on your behalf until the Court appoints a Conservator and/or Guardian.  Court proceedings take time and money. There are no guarantees the Court will select the same person you would have chosen.  But not all Durable Power of Attorneys are the same. You need an Elder Law Durable Power of Attorney.  If you have a Durable Power of Attorney which has not been prepared by an Elder Law attorney, your planning options could be drastically limited without court intervention.

To find an Elder Law Attorney near you who can help you with your Elder Care Matters, go to ElderCareMatters.comAmerica’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

Michigan State Coordinator - ElderCareMatters.com
Don L. Rosenberg, Attorney and Counselor
Michigan State Coordinator – ElderCareMatters.com


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about the difference between a Power of Attorney and a Durable Power of Attorney

Question:  What is the difference between a Power of Attorney and a Durable Power of Attorney?

Answer:  Both are legal documents where the client appoints an individual to act as his agent for purposes of financial matters. Both give the agent very broad financial powers, but can be more limited if the client decides to limit the agent’s powers. In the case of a general Power of Attorney, the agent is generally authorized to act once the client signs the document, but the agent’s authority ceases when and if the client becomes incapacitated. In the case of a Durable Power of Attorney, the agent is generally authorized to act once the client signs the document and can continue to act when and if the client becomes incapacitated. Hence the term “durable” which in this case means it survives the client’s incapacity. To make a power of attorney more useful, attorneys often add provisions regarding specific situations or transactions that might occur in the future, including the authority , when appropriate, to make gifts.

If you need help with this or other Elder Care Matters, you can find thousands of Elder Law Attorneys on ElderCareMatters.com – America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

spope
Sharon L. Pope, Esq.
CzepigaDalyPope LLC
Berlin, Connecticut
An ElderCare Matters Partner


When should an elder give up driving? – Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com

Question:  When should an elder give up driving?

Most people remember learning to drive and the feeling of independence it gave them. This is much of the reason it is so hard for an older adult to give up driving. When addressing the issues of driving with a parent, it is important to understand why driving is important to them. Is it an independence issue? Is it because they need transportation to appointments and errands? Is it an issue of control over their life? If transportation is the concern, then having alternative options to assist them in getting to appointments, the grocery store and other errands will be critical. If independence or control is the issue, it may be helpful to point out that this is not about taking away their independence or control, it is about their safety and equally important, the safety of others on the road. Many times older adults are less concerned about their own safety and well being than they are of the safety and well being of others, especially children.

This issue may be better received if presented by a person in a position of respect, such as a physician or an attorney. Another option is for a comprehensive assessment by a Certified Care Manager. In addition to assessing and making recommendations about the client’s current functional level, the appropriateness of their living environment and their overall safety, the Care Manager can assess driving safety and alternatives to driving. Many times information which will not be well received by the older adult is better delivered by a neutral third party than it is from a family member, especially a child.

If you need help with this or other elder care matters, you can find thousands of qualified Elder Care Professionals of ElderCareMatters.com – America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

hfrenette
Heather Frenette, RN, MSN, CMC
Gilbert, Arizona
An ElderCare Matters Partner


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about the legal term “Intestacy” – What is it?

Question:  My husband and I have heard that a Will is arguably the most
important legal document that the average person will ever sign. Why are
Wills so important, and what is “Intestacy”?

Answer:  If a person dies without making a Will he/she dies intestate. Without a Will, a decedent’s property will pass according to the State’s Intestate Succession Laws. If you are thinking that “intestacy” sounds like some sort of sickness, you may not be too far off the mark. When you see how the state distributes the funds of those who die intestate… you may feel a little sick.

In Connecticut, State statutes provide that if a person dies intestate, and there are children that are the children of the decedent and the spouse, the surviving spouse will receive the first $100,000 plus one half of the balance of the intestate estate. The children will receive the remainder. For example, assume a $500,000 estate: The spouse will receive $300,000 ($100,000 plus half of the remaining $400,000) and the children will receive the remaining $200,000 in equal proportions ($100,000 each). Now let us suppose that there is only one child who is 18 years-old. Even a very mature 18 year-old may have difficulty handling a check for $200,000.

Typically, when most people plan out their estate, they want all of their assets to go to the surviving spouse and not to their children. The thought is that the surviving spouse is in the best position to use the assets wisely for the benefit of the children. In many scenarios it does not make sense to hand a large sum of cash over to a child or young adult. Imagine trying to convince an 18 year-old into investing his/her money in a college education — good luck.

The rules are different if the decedent had children that were not children of the surviving spouse. In this case, the surviving spouse would receive one-half of the intestate estate, and the children would receive the balance. This solution seems to be based in logic. The state wants to make sure that the step-children of the surviving spouse are not taken advantage of by a person who is not related to them by blood. While this plan works in preventing the aforementioned problem, it still puts money into the hands of people who may not be ready to handle it. With a Will based plan you can direct where your assets go, as well as direct appropriate measures to protect your children from the problems that come with receiving a large sum of money outright.

If there are no children of the decedent, but the decedent is survived by a parent or parents, the spouse does not receive the entire intestate estate. In this scenario the surviving spouse will receive the first $100,000 plus three-quarters of the balance, and the parents would receive the balance of the estate. Furthermore, if there are no heirs to the estate, the decedent’s money, property, etc., will escheat to the state and the state will become the owner. It’s probably not a coincidence that you cannot spell escheat without “c-h-e-a-t.”

As you can see from the above sampling from the Connecticut Intestate Succession Statutes, by not planning for the disposition of your property the state has a plan for you. It should be no surprise that control freaks hate the laws of intestacy. It takes control (albeit control that was never exercised) of a person’s hand and vests that control with the State, who then applies cookie cutter solutions for unique situations. The only way to avoid intestacy is to make sure that you have a validly executed Will. Any other plan will fall short.

gguertin
George P. Guertin, Esq.
Guertin and Guertin, LLC
North Haven, Connecticut
An ElderCare Matters Partner


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about the transfer of your home to your children

Question:  Should I transfer my home to my kids to protect it if I should need nursing home care?

Answer:  The correct answer is “It depends”. It depends on your unique family, health, and financial situation. Tax consequences also have to be considered. In the event you need long-term care, there is a five year look-back period that applies to gifts (transfers of assets without consideration). Thus, if you are faced with a chronic or catastrophic illness within five years after you transfer the home to your children; such transfer may impact your ability to obtain Medicaid (Title 19) benefits. This is a very complicated area of the law and requires careful consideration.

If it makes sense to transfer the home to your children, there are several ways to structure the transfer. The first is an outright gift to your children. This is generally not advisable for tax reasons and asset protection purposes. The second is by completing the transfer but retaining a life estate. While generally superior to an outright gift, this is also not without problems. However, the retained life estate does give you some legal control over the property and also preserves some tax benefits associated with inherited property versus gifted property. The third is a transfer of your home to an irrevocable trust. This is usually the preferred method of protecting the home as it balances tax benefits with asset protection issues and also protects the home from your children’s creditors or in the event they should predecease you.

As you can see, the transfer of your home is something that requires careful consideration and sound legal counsel.

If you need help with this or other elder care legal matters and need to locate an Elder Law Attorney near you, go to:  ElderCareMatters.comAmerica’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

pczepiga
Paul T. Czepiga, Esq., CELA
Berlin, Connecticut
An ElderCare Matters Partner

 


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about Probate

Question:  I don’t quite understand what Probate is, but I have heard that this is something that we should try to avoid. Is this correct?

Answer:  Avoiding probate is not always a good idea depending on the circumstances of the matter.

Probate is the legal process by which assets of a deceased individual are distributed either according to his or her Last Will and Testament, or by state law if there is no Will (an “administration” proceeding).

When a person dies, his or her assets must be separated into two categories:

(1)   Non-probate: Non-probate assets are any assets for which the inheritors have been specifically named.  Some examples are accounts with beneficiary designations, in-trust-for accounts, Totten trusts, or joint assets with the right of survivorship.

(2)   Probate: all other assets in the name of the deceased.

Non-probate assets will pass to the named beneficiary or joint owner by operation of law, and therefore, the Will will have no relevance and will not control those assets. The probate process is only necessary when probate assets are left solely in the name of the deceased without a beneficiary designation. Even then, provided the total value of the assets is minimal and the identity of the heirs can be established, an affidavit may be sufficient to get the assets distributed to the heirs. When a person dies without a Will, his or her probate assets go through an “administration proceeding.” When a person dies with a Will, the probate assets go through a “probate proceeding.”

An administration proceeding is the process by which an heir of the deceased person will petition to the Surrogate’s Court to become the administrator of the estate of the deceased. The individual who may seek to become the administrator is determined by law and starts with the decedent’s spouse, then any of his or her children if there is no spouse, and so forth.  If approved by the Surrogate, the administrator will be issued “letters of administration” as proof of his or her authority to handle the estate of the decedent. The administrator is often required to file a bond as a condition of being appointed. Once appointed, the administrator is responsible for getting an employee identification number (EIN) for the estate, opening an estate account, locating and collecting all estate assets, paying debts and income and estate taxes if any, and then distributing the remaining assets according to a list provided under state statute.  For example, if the decedent is survived by a spouse but no children, the spouse will get all of the assets. However, if the decedent is survived by a spouse and children, the spouse will get first $50,000 and the remainder will be divided and distributed 50% to the spouse and 50% to the children.

A probate proceeding is the process by which a deceased person’s Last Will and Testament (“Will”) is proven to the Surrogate’s Court to be valid, after which the terms of the will are legally enforceable.  The process entails the following:

(1)   Filing the original Will with a verified petition for letters of testamentary to the Surrogate’s Court in the county where the deceased person was domiciled;

(2)   Providing notice to any and all individuals who would inherit from the deceased if there was no Will. This gives those individuals an opportunity to file objections as to why the Will is not valid and/or why the nominated executor should not be authorized to carry out the instructions of the Will;

(3)   Once the nominated executor is appointed, he or she will receive “letters of testamentary” as proof of his or her authority to handle the estate of the deceased;

(4)   The executor is then responsible for getting an employee identification number (EIN) for the estate, opening an estate account, locating and collecting all estate assets, paying debts and income and estate taxes, if any, and then distributing the remaining assets according to the decedent’s Will.

For individuals with assets in another state, an administration or probate proceeding may have to be initiated in the other state (an “ancillary probate”) as well as in New York. The best way to avoid probate is to have all assets held by a living trust, whether revocable or irrevocable.

You can find help with this and other Elder Care Matters on: ElderCareMatters.com – America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources.

An ElderCare Matters Partner
Ronald A. Fatoullah, Esq., CELA
Great Neck, New York
An ElderCare Matters Partner


Today’s Q&A on ElderCareMatters.com is about reversing a gift in order to qualify for Medicaid Benefits

Question:   Mom gifted her home to my sister several years ago.  Is there any way that this gift can be reversed so that Mom can be approved for Medicaid benefits?

Answer:  Many states allow a reduction of a transfer penalty by returning some of the transferred property. All states will eliminate a transfer penalty with return of 100% of the transferred assets. So, yes the penalty can be eliminated with return of the home. Whether you should do this or not requires a calculation dependent on when the gift was made as well as several other factors.

To find help with this and other elder care matters, go to: ElderCareMatters.comAmerica’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources for Families.

An ElderCare Matters Partner
Stephen J. Bailey, Esq.
Birmingham, Alabama
An ElderCare Matters Partner

 


Today’s Q&A about Medicaid Eligibility is answered by an Elder Law Attorney from Illinois

Question:  How would I know whether my elderly father is eligible to receive help from the government in order to live in a nursing home? He has no income, to speak of, other than his monthly Social Security check, has a very small checking account, owns his small home, and desperately needs nursing home assistance.

Answer:   You need to consult with an Experienced Elder Law Attorney in your State.  The cost of long term care in a Nursing Home is paid for either with the persons own money, private pay, or if you meet the financial and other qualifications Medicaid.  In addition, long term care may be paid by long term care insurance, by those lucky enough to have it.  However for most people their care is paid by liquidating all their assets and using them to pay the nursing home.  While Medicare pays for up to 100 days of rehabilitative care in the nursing home after 3 days of hospitalization and also pays for 2 weeks of respite or pain management care for hospice patients, it does not pay for long term care.  The government program that pays for long term care is Medicaid.  Unlike Medicare, Social Security Disability and Social Security, there is no right to Medicaid; it is up to you to establish your qualifications for Medicaid.

Medicaid has both asset and income limits.  The limit for non-exempt assets for an individual is $2,000.00. Assets above that amount must be spent down, converted into exempt assets or otherwise handled in a way compliant with the Medicaid provisions.  Your father’s small home is an exempt asset but only as long as he intends to return to it. Once he decides to stay in the nursing home permanently, or once the State has decided that it no longer believes that he is returning, then the home becomes a non-exempt asset and generally must be sold and the proceeds used to pay for his care.  It is important that you speak with an Elder Law Attorney prior to taking any steps with your father’s home, as there are exceptions in some States which allow in limited circumstances that it be transferred without penalty.  There are several strategies which allow you to preserve some additional funds for your father or the family, but whether you can use them depends upon the State in which your father resides and the actual facts of his circumstances.

In general all of his income must be spent on the nursing home with the exception of a small monthly allowance for the applicant’s personal use. In Illinois that personal exception is $30 per month.  In addition, your father’s qualification will be dependent upon what he has done with his money over the past 5 years. This is referred to as the look back period, and any transfers made by your father for less than fair market value, such as gifts, may result in a penalty period where Medicaid would not pay for his care. Based upon the facts you present I believe that with the assistance of an Experienced Elder Law Attorney, your father should be able to have Medicaid pay for his nursing home care, and with the Attorney’s assistance may be able to set aside a small fund of money for him.  Good Luck.

To find Elder Law Attorneys near you who can help you plan for and/or deal with your elder care matters, go to: ElderCareMatters.com – America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources.

James C. Siebert, Esq., An ElderCare Matters Partner
James C. Siebert, Esq.
Arlington Heights, Illinois
An ElderCare Matters Partner

 


Recent Posts

Stay in Touch with Elder Care Matters

 Facebook  Twitter  Google Plus  Linked  Blogger

eNewsletter Sign Up

ElderCare Answers

If you need answers to your elder care questions, send your questions to us at:

Answers@ElderCareMatters.com

Answers are provided by our ElderCare Matters Partners, some of America's TOP Elder Care Professionals who have years of experience in helping families plan for and deal with a wide range of Elder Care / Senior Care Services.

All Q&A's are posted on the homepage of ElderCareMatters.com

ElderCare Matters Articles

ElderCare Matters Articles are useful and up-to-date Elder Care / Senior Care articles that are provided by our ElderCare Matters Partners to help you plan for and deal with your family's elder care matters.

If you help familes plan for or deal with elder care matters, then you owe it to yourself and to families across America to become a professional member of the National ElderCare Matters Alliance and to be listed on the many Elder Care / Senior Care Directories that are sponsored by this National Alliance of Elder Care Professionals.

ElderCareDirectories.com

For additional information about professional membership in the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, (including the many benefits of becoming one of our ElderCare Matters Partners) and to download an Application for your Basic, Premium or Partner Membership in the National ElderCare Matters Alliance, visit: ElderCare Matters Alliance.